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Garry Kimovich Kasparov    Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov

               Site: Lithuania  Vilnius
               Event Date: III-IV, 1984

               FINAL MATCH
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 TOTAL 
01 Soviet Union  Azerbaijan  Garry Kasparov ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 8.5/13 
02 Soviet Union  Russia  Vasily Smyslov ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 4.5/13 





Garry Kimovich Kasparov    Viktor Lvovich Korchnoi

               Site: United Kingdom  London
               Event Date: XI-XII, 1983

               SEMIFINAL MATCH 1
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 TOTAL 
01 Soviet Union  Azerbaijan  Garry Kimovich Kasparov 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 7.0/11 
02 Switzerland  Russia  Viktor Lvovich Korchnoi 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 4.0/11 

 
Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov    Zoltán Ribli

               Site: United Kingdom  London
               Event Date: XI-XII, 1983

               SEMIFINAL MATCH 2
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 TOTAL 
01 Soviet Union  Russia  Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov 1 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 6.5/11 
02 Hungary  Hungary  Zoltán Ribli 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 4.5/11 





Viktor Lvovich Korchnoi    Lajos Portisch

               Site: Germany  Bad Kissingen
               Event Date: 1983

               QUARTERFINAL MATCH 1
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 TOTAL 
01 Switzerland  Russia  Viktor Lvovich Korchnoi 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 6.0/9 
02 Hungary  Hungary  Lajos Portisch 0 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 3.0/9 

 
Garry Kimovich Kasparov    Alexander Genrikhovich Beliavsky

               Site: Russia  Moscow
               Event Date: 1983

               QUARTERFINAL MATCH 2
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 TOTAL 
01 Soviet Union  Azerbaijan  Garry Kimovich Kasparov ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 6.0/9 
02 Slovenia  Ukraine  Alexander Genrikhovich Beliavsky ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 0 0 3.0/9 

 
Robert Hübner    Vasily Vasilyevich Smyslov

               Site: Germany  Velden
               Event III-IV, 1983

               QUARTERFINAL MATCH 3
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 TOTAL 
01 Germany  Germany  Robert Hübner ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 7.0/14 
02 Soviet Union  Russia  Vasily Smyslov ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 7.0/14 

 
Eugenio Torre    Zoltán Ribli
          Wikipedia - Eugenio Torre
          Wikipedia - Zoltán Ribli
          Wikipedia - World Chess Championship 1984
       ;   Wikipedia - World Chess Championship
          View all games in full screen


               Site: Spain  Alicante
               Event 1983

               QUARTERFINAL MATCH 4
FLAGS  NAME 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 TOTAL 
01 Philippines  Philippines  Eugenio Torre ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 4.0/10 
02 Hungary  Hungary  Zoltán Ribli ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1 6.0/10 



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World Chess Championship 1984 - External Links

   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - View all games in full screen
   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - View all games in full screen
   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - View all games in full screen
   1983 Candidates Matches - View all games in full screen
   1982 Las Palmas - Interzonal Tournament - View all games in full screen
   1983 Malmö - Playoff - View all games in full screen
   1982 Moscow - Interzonal Tournament - View all games in full screen
   1982 Toluca - Interzonal Tournament - View all games in full screen

   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - All Games
   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - All Games
   1984 Anatoly Karpov - Garry Kasparov (I) - All Games
   1983 Candidates Matches - All Games
   1982 Las Palmas - Interzonal Tournament - All Games
   1983 Malmö - Playoff - All Games
   1982 Moscow - Interzonal Tournament - All Games
   1982 Toluca - Interzonal Tournament - All Games

   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1986 Kasparov - Karpov Title Match (III)
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1985 Kasparov - Karpov Title Match (II)
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1984 Karpov - Kasparov Title Match (I)
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1982-84 Candidates Matches
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1982 Toluca Interzonal Tournament
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1982 Las Palmas Interzonal Tournament
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - 1982 Moscow Interzonal Tournament
   Mark Weeks' Chess Pages - World Chess Championship - Zonals 1981-84 (C12)
   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - World Chess Championship

Denmark   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - VM i skak 1984
Germany   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Schachweltmeisterschaft 1984/85
United Kingdom   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - World Chess Championship 1984
Finland   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Shakin maailmanmestaruusottelu 1984
France   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Championnat du monde d'échecs 1984
Italy   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Campionato del mondo di scacchi 1984
Portugal   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Campeonato Mundial de Xadrez de 1984
Russia   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - World Chess Championship 1984
Spain   Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Campionat del món d'escacs de 1984



World Chess Championship 1984


The World Chess Championship 1984 was a match between challenger Garry Kasparov and defending champion Anatoly Karpov. After 5 months and 48 games, the match was eventually abandoned in controversial circumstances with Karpov leading five wins to three (with 40 draws), and replayed in the World Chess Championship 1985.

Qualification

Interzonals

Three Interzonal tournaments were held. The top two finishers in each qualified. Kasparov, aged 19 years old at the time, won the Moscow Interzonal by a convincing 1.5 point margin ahead of Alexander Beliavsky. Zoltan Ribli won the Las Palmas first Interzonal ahead of 62-year-old former World Champion Vasily Smyslov, and the Toluca Interzonal was won jointly by Lajos Portisch and Eugenio Torre.

Candidates

The six Interzonal qualifiers were joined by Victor Korchnoi and Robert Hübner, the Candidates finalists from the previous cycle (World Chess Championship 1981). The eight players participated in a series of knockout matches. The winner was Garry Kasparov.



Candidates Controversies

The Smyslov-Hübner match was originally tied at 5-5. After playing four extra games without breaking the tie, the match was resolved by a spin of the roulette wheel.

Politics threatened Kasparov's semi-final match against Viktor Korchnoi, which was scheduled to be played in Pasadena, California. Korchnoi had defected from the Soviet Union in 1976, and was at that time the strongest active non-Soviet player. Various political manoeuvres prevented Kasparov from playing Korchnoi in the United States, and Kasparov forfeited the match. This was resolved when Korchnoi agreed for the match to be replayed in London, along with the Vasily Smyslov vs. Zoltan Ribli match. The Korchnoi-Kasparov match was put together on short notice by Raymond Keene. Kasparov lost the first game but won the match 7-4 (four wins, one loss).

Championship match



The championship match between Karpov and Kasparov had many ups and downs, and a very controversial finish. Karpov started in very good form, and after nine games Kasparov was down 4-0 in a "first to six wins" match. Fellow players predicted he would be whitewashed 6-0 within 18 games.

But Kasparov dug in and battled Karpov to 17 successive draws. He lost game 27, then fought back with another series of draws until game 32, his first-ever win against the World Champion. Another 15 successive draws followed, through game 46; the previous record length for a world title match had been 34 games, the match of José Capablanca vs. Alexander Alekhine in 1927.

At this point Karpov, 12 years older than Kasparov, was close to exhaustion, and did not look like the player who started the match. Kasparov won games 47 and 48 to bring the scores to 5-3 in Karpov's favour. Then the match was ended without result by Florencio Campomanes, the President of Fédération Internationale des Échecs (FIDE), and a new match was announced to start a few months later.

The termination was controversial, as both players stated that they preferred the match to continue. Announcing his decision at a press conference, Campomanes cited the health of the players, which had been strained by the length of the match (5 months: September 10, 1984 to February 8, 1985). Karpov had lost 10 kg (22 lb). But Kasparov was in excellent health and extremely resentful of Campomanes' decision, asking him why he was abandoning the match if both players wanted to continue. Kasparov had won the last two games before the suspension, and some observers believed that he would go on to win despite his 5-3 deficit. He appeared to be physically stronger than his opponent, and in the later games seemed to have been playing the better chess.

The match became the first, and so far only, world championship match to be abandoned without result.

The restarted match (the World Chess Championship 1985) was best of 24, with the champion (Karpov) to retain his title if the match was drawn 12-12. Because Karpov's 2 point lead from the 1984 match was wiped out, Karpov was granted the right of a return match (the World Chess Championship 1986) if he lost.

Crucial game 16

One move in game 16 may have had a profound effect on chess history. In this position, Karpov was tired and offered a draw (and Kasparov accepted) (Kasparov 2008:137–38). Karpov should have won if he had played 37... Rd5! At this point Karpov was leading the match 4-0. If he had won this game, his win in game 27 would have ended the match with a 6-0 victory.

Andy Soltis and Yasser Seirawan discuss this possible scenario. Kasparov would be demoralized after his 0-6 defeat and would not have been the same player that he soon became. Karpov would have remained World Champion for perhaps a decade, and Kasparov would not have split from FIDE as he did in 1993 to form the Professional Chess Association. The havoc that this split caused in the World Championship for 15 years would not have occurred (Soltis 2010:12).

 

     World Chess Championship 1985. (13 November 2011 at 00:18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18 November 2011, at 11.05, from
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Chess_Championship_1984





  
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